Embroidery is useful for your kid

Embroidery is useful for your kid

A lot of parents wonder when they should start teaching their kids the basics of handicraft. Some aren’t sure if that’s a good idea altogether.

It is believed that 5 or 7-year-old kids are ready to begin familiarizing themselves with embroidery. One of the main reasons why it’s the best age to get started is that the child already knows how to handle a sharp needle.

If you ask us whether it’s useful, the answer is a confident Yes!

Embroidery develops preschoolers’ fine motors skills. What is that and why does it matter? It improves the coordination of finger moves, trains smaller muscles and stimulates numerous sensory nerve endings on the palms. Besides, embroidery engages several body systems at the same time, including the nervous, muscular, skeletal, and ocular system! It’s the well-coordinated functioning of these systems that’s referred to as fine motor skills. They are triggered when we write, turn over pages of a book, and take various objects with our hands.

Meanwhile, a number of brain areas are involved in the process as well. Fine motions with small objects stimulate the brain and train it to plan actions before performing them. Later on, this ability is extrapolated to speech.

Furthermore, embroidery improves concentration and develops perseverance. It also helps kids set their goals, given that it’s a multitude of actions that lead to a specific result. Yet another benefit of this activity is that it enhances creative thinking skills. Having learned the main techniques and types of stitches, kids can create new designs, decorate garments, and tailor ornaments on their own.

So, in case you have decided to teach your kid the art of embroidery, the following tips will come in handy:

Start with the basics. First, make one stitch together, play around with it, and come up with some interesting way to use it. Then, you can gradually expand the skill set. Keep in mind that repetition is the mother of all skill! Emphasize how important it is to make sure the piece of embroidery is neat and tidy.

Next, you can offer stitching simple designs on big canvas. This will help the beginning little artisan achieve fascinating results.

It’s very important to make the workspace as convenient as possible. Some of the essential elements include lights that are bright enough, comfortable table and a cozy chair for your kid.

Embroidery should bring lots of joy and pleasure, so don’t impose it on your kid too persistently. It’s not that easy for him or her to focus on such a delicate process. If the work is in full swing, though, be sure to support your child and demonstrate how proud you are, even if things aren’t going smooth from the start.

By the way, have you noticed that we didn’t mention boys or girls specifically? That’s because boys like embroidery a lot, too – especially if it’s “Star Wars” or “Harry Potter” themed!

We wish you patience and inspiration!




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